Michael Lamb on Fathers and Children

April 22, 2019 by Robert Franklin, Member, National Board of Directors, National Parents Organization

Dr. Michael Lamb is possibly the most knowledgeable person about the benefits to children of paternal involvement in their lives.  He is extremely highly respected by his peers.  So it’s always a pleasure and a learning experience to read his work.  Here’s a short article of his that expounds on the effects of father-child relationships and children’s well-being, both at the time and later in life (The Good Men Project, 4/21/19).

Put simply, close, active father-child attachment is associated with a host of benefits for kids.

Read More…

The post Michael Lamb on Fathers and Children appeared first on Massachusetts Trafficking Humans.

No Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Massachusetts Human Trafficking
NY City Council Asks Why Parents are Being Accused of Child Abuse for Simply Using Marijuana

Manhattan Councilwoman Carlina Rivera and Brooklyn Councilman Stephen Levin at a NY City Council hearing on how marijuana use can lead to investigations of child abuse (John McCarten / City Council – Source) City Council Asks Why NYC Is ‘Tearing Families Apart’ For Marijuana Use by Yasmeen Khan, WNYCGothamist.com Excerpts: Read More

Massachusetts Human Trafficking
Nebraska Courts Approve Shared Parenting Even amid High Conflict

April 21, 2019 by Rober Franklin, Member, National Board of Directors, National Parents Organization Two Nebraska courts have gotten it right on shared parenting.  More importantly, the case may be a harbinger of things to come.  The case of Leners v. Leners was probably not easy to decide, particularly for Read More

Massachusetts Human Trafficking
Social Workers Poorly Trained for Children’s Welfare

April 19, 2019 by Robert Franklin, Member, National Board of Directors, National Parents Organization As if children’s welfare agencies don’t have enough problems, now comes this (Chronicle of Social Change, 4/9/19).  It’s a piece by Tom Morton, a veteran of some 39 years’ experience in social work.  Although tactful, Morton is none Read More